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Vibrant culture.

What does that mean?

The office is buzzing with energetic and passionate go-getters that care about each other. While Windsor Circle thrives off of creativity, differences, and diversity all members come together over a set of core values that keep them shooting for the stars. Among these values, openness and transparency continues to be an employee favorite. The company is growing fast and looking for adaptable, and hungry adventurers to join the team. While the company is evolving at a rapid pace, and change is constant, the mission of building an honest, open and challenging culture is here to stay.

What's with the green pants?

  

Perks and Benefits

Our Values are below.

All employees come together and allow these to be used as core guiding thoughts. Scroll through to see our principles around communication, team, focus, and compensation.

Openness and Transparency in All Cases.

Above all things, people want to trust one another. People are strong enough to handle the truth. We speak openly about things, and have the courage and conviction to trust one another with difficult topics. This is true regardless of who's involved (employees, customers, investors, partners or others).

Facts, Not Claims.

Our communications, both as individuals, and as a company, is rooted in fact. If it's said, it must be backed up.

Fairness Starts with Objective Data Points

Do your research. Be open to others' research. We trust each other not to skew or obscure the data.

Two Ears, One Mouth.

It is a human tendency to speak first. It is far better to "seek first to understand, then to be understood." We start by listening.

All Employees are Shareholders.

The best way to achieve alignment between employees and their goal of maximizing value to shareholders is to make them shareholders. Team members at Windsor Circle have equity and/or options as part of their compensation plan.

Teams Survive Longer than Individuals.

A common team building exercise involves a hypothetical crash in the desert or in the arctic. You can only take 10 items as you try to survive. You do the exercise first as an individual. You do it again as a group. You then compare the results to those of survival experts, like Navy Seals, who theoretically could survive the best. The group almost always gets more items right than the individual. Lesson: teams survive longer than individuals. Employees Grow the Business. Leaders Grow the Employees. Both roles are accountable to excellence.

Lead from the Front.

Do what you expect your team to do.

Make Mistakes.

It’s ok to be wrong and it’s ok to make mistakes. Admit them, learn from them, and move on. We believe that people not making mistakes are either not taking enough risks, or they’re not admitting them, or both.

Dish the Ball.

Your teammates are as committed and capable as you. Delegate responsibility and then get out of the way.

Pareto’s Law rules.

80% of the value will come from 20% of the effort. We focus on the most important things and execute on them relentlessly.

The Customer Dictates the Truth.

This is more than "the customer is always right." This is an orientation, throughout our company, that we provide a service for our customers. If there is a question about what direction to take on a specific issue, we ask what the paying customer thinks. That will be the answer.

Everyone is in Sales.

Those who think that sales is someone else’s job should find another job. Everyone should be asking, at all times, "What problem are you trying to solve?" We all forthrightly help and ask for an opportunity to explain why we think so and to seek the opportunity to win that business.

If You Can’t Measure It, Don’t Do It.

Things that cannot be measured cannot be improved. Things that cannot be improved are rarely worth doing.

The Art of the Possible

The "art of the possible" is a tremendous form of problem solving because it checks all of the "why nots" at the door. We focus on the desired result, name 100 ways to get there, and then choose the most viable option.

Don’t Think Outside the Box. Shred the Box.

It’s just business. The only rules (and they are of utmost and paramount importance) are honesty, integrity, and legality. If you can check those three boxes, you can and should break all other rules in the pursuit of helping our clients maximize overall success. Question assumptions. Challenge the status quo

Those Who Say It Can’t Be Done Should Not Get in the Way of Those Doing It.

The biggest accomplishments in human history are the ones that seemed impossible. But someone did them.

Ask. The Worst They Can Say Is “No.”

This is the execution part of "art of the possible." When you think someone might turn something down, ask. Let them turn you down. On the off chance that they say "yes," you will receive benefits that no one else thought possible.

No Substitute for Ownership and Fair Compensation.

Foosball and free sodas are poor substitutes for fair financial compensation and ownership in an exciting, growth-oriented business. Doesn't mean that we won't have fun. And we'll very likely have free soda. But we won't confuse the fact that our employees' well-being, and that of their families, are of paramount importance to them. The nice-to-haves are just that. Nice to have.

Michael Huey

Michael Huey, Technical Project Manager

"Working for Windsor Circle is like being a member of a championship winning team. You work hard, you love it, and while it's happening, you create memories with your team that no one else will ever be able to match. Yeah, it's that awesome."

 

 

 

 

 

Ministry of Shenanigans

A team dedicated to being quirky social ambassators for the team.

 

 

 

Open office culture

It is no surprise to see Matt, CEO pop in and give out some goodies!

 

 

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